Hot Dog of the Week: Dat Dog

Image via Dat Dog

Dish: Spicy Chipotle Veggie Dog with ketchup, sweet relish, and guacamole
Restaurant: Dat Dog, 5030 Freret Street, New Orleans, LA 70115
Price Tag: $7.50

There are few things more satisfying than a fully loaded hot dog when you’re hungry: the heat of the dog, the slightly crisp, doughy bun. The delightful blend of toppings. The way it just fills your gut when you need it most.

Then again, a hot dog can be a sad affair. Imagine a slimy tube of mystery meat inside a gummy white bun, topped with high-fructose corn syrup-laced ketchup. You’ll get your …

Read More...

California Road Trippin’: Roasted Garlic Ice Cream

Garlic Ice Cream

You can’t call yourself a true garlic lover until you’re daring enough to try garlic ice cream…and like it. I fell in love with garlic ice cream back in 2006 at the Gilroy Garlic Festival, one of the largest food festivals in the United States with food, drinks, arts & crafts and live entertainment. It’s a garlic lover’s paradise with garlic-enhanced dishes like calamari, scampi, garlic fries, and of course, garlic bread.

Garlic ice cream is really an acquired taste that people often find difficult to describe. If you aren’t one of the many who hate

Read More...

SKC Abroad: Marrakech Express

Rabat Train Station

I’d like to preface this post by saying that Americans are all wrong about food. All of our individually-packaged, single-order meals create a society that’s all about selfish eating (this one is mine and that one is yours). We even have individually-wrapped cheese! “Family-style” is a generally associated with eating at home or hokey, themed restaurants. But we’re wrong, food shouldn’t be hoarded, it should be shared down to the last bite.

While the real Marrakech Express refers to the train Graham Nash (of Crosby, Stills, and Nash) took from Casablanca to Marrakech, Morocco, my travel buddy and fellow American …

Read More...

Hog Roast with a Healthy Twist

Basting

Early last week, I returned to the United States for the first time in a year. After a year of adapting to other cultures, I was ready to unleash my inner American. And what better time to do so than the Fourth of July?

For the Fourth, I was craving something over-the-top American. Yet I was also concerned about poor American eating habits, which are extremely evident to me after spending a year abroad. Upon re-entry to Iowa, I was struck by the commonness of obesity in my home state. Where as before it seemed normal, now …

Read More...

Big Apple, Small Basket: Week #1

DSC_1043

Welcome to a new summer weekly installment at SKC called Big Apple, Small Basket.  Check back to read more about Kendra’s adventures in finding, maneuvering and cooking summer dishes from the many farmers’ markets in New York City.

Landing a supercool internship in New York City for the summer meant one big thing: I’d be leaving home (the San Francisco Bay Area) and my other home (Chicago, where I go to school) for two months to live and work in a buzzing metropolis that I’d only ever been a wide-eyed tourist in before.  New York City?!  My palms …

Read More...

Life on a Vineyard: The Food

Lunch Time

As you saw in my last post, life on the vineyard is hard work. Six days a week, morning to night tending grapevines; pruning them, training them to supports and cultivating the fields with tractors and horses.

If there is one rule any farmer knows best, it’s this: hard work necessitates revitalizing breaks. Most breaks are built around meals. Breakfast must be filling, lunch must be light and fuss-free, dinner must be hearty and rejuvenating. Meals were a time to kick off your shoes, lean back in your chair, eat your fill, socialize, and generally recharge.

And …

Read More...

Best of Seattle’s Pike Place Market

IMG_0750


Yes, Seattle is a beautiful place. The unrelenting gloomy drizzle is more than made up for by the picturesque scenery, complete with lush forests, snow-capped mountains, and vast bodies of water dotted with skittering ferry boats (Grey’s Anatomy, anyone?). But the setting is only a bonus for me, because the main reason I’ve always dreamed of visiting this city is for the food. Seattle has built a vibrant food culture with a strong support network for local producers, resulting in some of the freshest, most full-of-character grub I’ve ever seen. When I found out that I’d be living here for …

Read More...

Polish Smoked Whitefish Salad

Whitefish Salad

As someone who travels for food, I was less than ecstatic about visiting Poland. Even though I am of Polish ancestry, in my mind the food was synonymous with potatoes, cabbage, and a whole lot of butter – not exactly the light summer meals I was accustomed to in the south of France. I prepared for the worst…

After an exhausting day of travel I arrived in Gdansk. Not five minutes later, I was shoveling sweet strawberries with homemade whipped cream into my mouth while my mother enjoyed fresh chocolate pudding. Later that night, our host family served …

Read More...

SKC Abroad: Dolmeh

dolmeh 2

Dolmeh – stuffed grape leaves – have always been associated with Greek food for me. As it turns out, they’re a generally Middle Eastern dish, and there are multiple ways of making them depending on the country. With only a week left in Israel, my Israeli roommate Ruthy surprisingly showed up with supplies to make dolmeh, but in this case, Lebanese style.

Depending on how many you’re planning to make, dolmeh aren’t hard but they can be time consuming. As amateur dolmeh makers, it took us some time with our first round, but with some practice we were able to …

Read More...

Life on a Vineyard: The Wine

The Vines

After spending two weeks working on a biodynamic vineyard, I have a newfound respect for wine and wine producers. Caring for grapevines, harvesting grapes, and turning the juice into a delicious but complicated product is hard labor, and takes more knowledge, time, and dedication that I ever imagined.

Mas de Libian winery in Saint Marcel d’Ardèche, France is owned and operated by the Thibon-Macagno family – and has been since 1670. Twenty-five hectares are currently farmed by Jean-Pierre (lovingly called Papounet), his wife Jacqueline (whom we call Ou-i), their daughter Hélène and her husband Alain, and their second …

Read More...